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Fremont Adult School to Offer Clinical Massage Therapy Next Year

21 November 2008 One Comment
         

Dr. Robin Buckwalter, a medical chiropractor and massage therapist, treats a patient at her office in Mission San Jose. Buckwalter will be teaching a clinical massage therapy course beginning in February at the Fremont Adult School.

Dr. Robin Buckwalter, a medical chiropractor and massage therapist, treats a patient at her office in Mission San Jose. Buckwalter will be teaching a clinical massage therapy course beginning in February at the Fremont Adult School.

 

By Tyler Sipe  —

 
Officials at the Fremont Adult School hope members of the public take their economic aches and pains into a relaxing new career opportunity at the recenly established Clinical Massage Therapy Certification Course.  
Dr. Robin Buckwalter, D.C. (Doctor of Chiropractic), director and primary instructor for the program, will provide her three decades of clinical massage therapy experience for the course.
 
Buckwalter said despite the current economic environment, long-term future growth in the massage therapy industry looks promising. She cited a recent report from the California Economic Development Department expecting 11% growth for massage therapists in the next five years.
 
“I think there will be a lot more opportunities with the aging demographic,” Buckwalter said. “Massage therapy will continue to grow in popularity, especially since it is being seen as a remedy to treat a host of health problems.”
 
Scheduled to open in February, the Fremont Adult School will offer the 300-hour, 20-week intensive program for individuals interested in the expanding clinical massage therapy industry for a cost of about $2,000, which includes tuition and fees. 
 
The cost is significantly less than other massage schools in the area, including the nationally and world renowned National Holistic Institute in Emeryville, which cost more than $16,000 for tuition, books and other expenses, during the 2007-2008 academic year according to www.univerisities.com.  However, the course at the institute requires more than 1,000 hours of training.
 
The class can accommodate 26 students, and pupils will study several sciences related to the body and how massage technique can improve client health.  Students also learn about business practices, sanitary and safety practices and are required to work externships.
 
Buckwalter said the program aims to prepare students for work at spas, health clinics and retirement centers.

But most of all, she hopes to fill the void of quallified massage therapists working in Fremont.

Sam Kress, owner of Family Massage Therapy, agreed the local market could have better trained practitioners.

“I’m still having trouble finding qualified massage therapists,” said Kress, who has owned her business for 20 years, and has six independent contractors work from her office.  “Many people don’t have the massage knowledge, or the anatomy or physiology knowledge.
 
“I’m not a spa, we do therapy work and educate the client on what they can do in the outside world to improve their health.”
 
Fremont resident Barbara Block has been a patient of Buckwalter’s for 20 years, receiving chiropractic and massage treatments once a month for shoulder, leg and neck ailments.
 
“(Buckwalter) has a fabulous touch and if she can teach others massage therapy that will be wonderful,” said Block, who has visited over a dozen different massage therapists over the years and said few have compared to the technical and professional level of Buckwalter.
   
Melanie Wade, principal of the Fremont Adult School, evaluated market research before concluding the school would establish the clinical massage therapy course.
 
Wade said the course could provide local residents with flexible schedules and good paying jobs with average starting salaries between $21 to $35 an hour. Those who earn more experience in clinical massage therapy could make upward of $75 an hour.
 
“The health and medical sector is one of the fastest growing employment fields in the local job market,” Wade said.  “We hope for a very high success rate with our first year students with the potential of expanding the course in the future.” 

 

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